This blog provides an informal forum for terrestrial invertebrate watchers to post recent sightings of interesting observations in the southern Vancouver Island region. Please send your sightings by email to Jeremy Tatum (jtatum@uvic.ca). Be sure to include your name, phone number, the species name (common or scientific) of the invertebrate you saw, location, date, and number of individuals. If you have a photograph you are willing to share, please send it along. Click on the title above for an index of past sightings.The index is updated most days.

2022 June 30 morning

2022 June 30 morning

    Mike Yip writes from Nanoose:   I had an unexpected visitor on Sunday,  a Hoary Comma,  that was a long way from home.  It was the 21st  butterfly for my yard list.

 

Hoary Comma Polygonia gracilis (Lep.: Nymphalidae)  Mike Yip

Hoary Comma Polygonia gracilis (Lep.: Nymphalidae)  Mike Yip

Four-spotted Skimmer Libellula quadrimaculata (Odo.: Libellulidae)  Mike Yip

Eight-spotted Skimmer Libellula forensis (Odo.: Libellulidae)  Mike Yip

Common Whitetail Plathemis lydia (Odo.: Libellulidae)  Mike Yip

2022 June 29

2022 June 29

    Jeremy Tatum writes:  This moth flew into my Saanich apartment (right opposite that Bank of Montreal!) this morning, and it perched on my leg.  It is rather worn but still just recognizable, I think, as Apamea amputatrix:

 

Apamea amputatrix (Lep.: Noctuidae)   Jeremy Tatum

   By contrast, the next moth is pristine fresh, just out of its pupa.  It is the third and last of the three Coryphista meadii that I managed to rear successfully from eggs this year.

Coryphista meadii (Lep.: Geometridae)  Jeremy Tatum

2022 June 28

2022 June 28

   Rosemary shows a sexton beetle with hanger-on mites from the Kemp Lake area, June 26

 

Nicrophorus defodiens (Col.: Silphidae)

with probably Poicilochirus sp. (Mesostigmata: Parasitidae)

Rosemary Jorna

 

     Jeremy Tatum shows two photographs of a Large Yellow Underwing.  They may be compared with another individual of this variable species shown on June 21.  In the second of today’s photographs of the moth we catch a small glimpse of the yellow hindwings.

Large Yellow Underwing Noctua pronuba (Lep.: Noctuidae)  Jeremy Tatum

 

Large Yellow Underwing Noctua pronuba (Lep.: Noctuidae)  Jeremy Tatum

   Steven Roias reports that a Polyphemus Moth  emerged today from the second of two cocoons that he has been watching through the winter.   The first one (see June 26) was a girl; today’s was a boy.  The boys have huge bipectinate antennae.

2022 June 27

2022 June 27

    Devon Parker reports some butterflies from the 410 m (1345 ft) summit of Mount McDonald in Langford, June 24:

One Grey Hairstreak (hill-topping)

One Propertius Duskywing

One Western Spring Azure (male)

One Western Spring Azure (female)

and a Propertius Duskywing nectaring on Triteleia hyacinthina at 350 m (1148 ft) on the east slope.

Grey Hairstreak Strymon melinus (Lep.: Lycaenidae)  Devon Parker

 

Propertius Duskywing Erynnis propertius (Lep.: Hesperiidae)  Devon Parker

Jeremy Tatum sends a photograph of a moth reared from an egg found on Mahonia on Mount Tolmie, May 29:

Coryphista meadii (Lep.: Geometridae)  Jeremy Tatum

  Compare this moth with a different colour variety of the same species shown on June 23.  Compare it also with Triphosa haesitata shown on June 5.

   Jeff Gaskin writes:  I went out in the stifling heat yesterday afternoon, June 26, to Ten Mile Point.  I did find a few butterflies, among them a Red Admiral along Arbutus Road in a batch of Armenian Blackberry flowers.  Also at this location was a Pale Tiger Swallowtail. Another Pale Tiger Swallowtail was further along Arbutus Road, and still another was on Sea View Road,  where I also saw a Western Tiger Swallowtail.  Oddly enough I didn’t see either Cabbage White or Lorquin’s Admiral on the Point.  Another Western Tiger Swallowtail was along Cadboro Bay Road near Sinclair Road, and another Pale Tiger Swallowtail was on Haro Road.  A Lorquin’s Admiral was at my mother’s house on Wascana Street in the Gorge neighbourhood.

2022 June 26 afternoon

2022 June 26 afternoon

    Jeremy Tatum writes:  This morning I saw my first Lorquin’s Admiral of the year, at Rithet’s Bog.   And this afternoon at 4:00 pm there were several Lorquin’s Admirals and Anise, Western Tiger and Pale Tiger Swallowtails flying around the Philadelphus  bush at the entrance to the Mount Tolmie reservoir.

Gordon Hart writes:  I went up Knockan Hill yesterday (June 25) and I actually saw a few butterflies: four Lorquin’s Admirals, a Western Spring Azure, four Western Tiger Swallowtails, and one Pale Tiger Swallowtail.  Later, I went to Fort Rodd Hill, and saw no butterflies at all. I think they will have more later in the season.  I don’t have any more butterfly photos, but I am enclosing a fly from Knockan Hill.

Jeremy Tatum responds:  I don’t know the exact species of fly – a specialist should be able to tell from Gordon’s photograph – but I believe it is a bombyliid of the genus Anthrax.

 

Anthrax sp. (Dip.: Bombyliidae)   Gordon Hart

 

Take a look at this spectacular video by Rosemary Jorna of a caterpillar of a Ceanothus Silk Moth Hyalophora euryalus eating Hardhack:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uz5mpvd7uq9uq2d/P6263169.mov?dl=0