This blog provides an informal forum for terrestrial invertebrate watchers to post recent sightings of interesting observations in the southern Vancouver Island region. Please send your sightings by email to Jeremy Tatum (tatumjb352@gmail.com). Be sure to include your name, phone number, the species name (common or scientific) of the invertebrate you saw, location, date, and number of individuals. If you have a photograph you are willing to share, please send it along. Click on the title above for an index of past sightings.The index is updated most days.

2024 March 23 morning

2024 March 23 morning

Some pre-dawn work by Ian Cooper from *Colquitz River Park and by the 9 km marker on the # Galloping Goose Trail in View Royal.  We thank Dr Robb Bennett for the spider identifications.

#Female linyphiine spider (Ara.: Linyphiidae – Linyphiinae)  Ian Cooper

*Female Cybaeus (probably signifer) (Ara.: Cybaeidae) Ian Cooper

*Immature male Clubiona  (Ara.: Clubionidae)  Ian Cooper

*Immature male theridiid (Ara.: Theridiidae)  Ian Cooper

#Female Pimoa altioculata (Ara.: Pimoidae)

Unidentified moth caterpillar (Lep.: Noctuidae)   Ian Cooper

 

Noctua pronuba  (Lep.: Noctuidae)  Ian Cooper

Jochen Möhr photographed this moth at his Metchosin home:

American Tissue Moth Triphosa haesitata  (Lep.: Geometridae)
Jochen Möhr

2024 March 21

2024 March 21

   Jeremy Tatum sends a photograph of this woodling moth that flew into his living room in Saanich last night.   Moths of the genus Egira are known as “woodling”moths.  They are largely western moths, and they are among the first noctuid moths to be seen in Spring.  Egira hiemalis is the earliest, usually appearing in February.  E. curialis (below) and others follow later.


Egira curialis
(Lep.: Noctuidae)  Jeremy Tatum

2024 March 20

2024 March 20

   Happy Nowruz, everyone!

Now that Spring is here, insects are starting to stir, although this syrphid fly photographed yesterday by Aziza Cooper seems to have had a chilly night, for it is covered with dew.

 

Hover fly (Dip.: Syrphidae)  Aziza Cooper

 

Jochen Möhr was wondering why we seem to have more butterflies here in suburban Victoria than he sees in the wilds of Metchosin.  We are glad to hear, therefore, that on March 19 Jochen at last saw his first Mourning Cloak of the year on William Head Road.  Unfortunately much too briefly even to attempt to photograph it.  Jeremy Tatum writes:  Well, I haven’t seen a Mourning Cloak yet this year – so Metchosin can’t be all that bad!

2024 March 19

2024 March 19

Spring starts at 10:06 pm PDT this evening.

Aziza photographed this Mourning Cloak on the Mount Tolmie reservoir on March 18.

Mourning Cloak  Nymphalis antiopa (Lep. Nymphalidae)  Aziza Cooper

   Aziza writes:  Today, March 19, I saw three Mourning Cloaks – one along the Colquitz Creek path near Marigold Street, one flushed from Conway Road near Interurban Road, and one at the Beaver Lake Riding Ring trails (photograph of this one below).  Two California Tortoiseshells were still on the Mount Tolmie reservoir at 5:30 pm.

Mourning Cloak  Nymphalis antiopa (Lep. Nymphalidae)  Aziza Cooper

 

Here are more of Ian Cooper’s photographs from this morning at *Colquitz River Park and the #Galloping Goose Trail in View Royal.


* Young Limax maximus (Pul.: Limacidae)  Ian Cooper

 

 

* Adult Limax maximus (Pul.: Limacidae)  Ian Cooper

 

# Eratigena (probably duellica)  (Ara: Agelenidae)  Ian Cooper

 

 

# Linyphiid spider, probably Neriene sp. (Ara.: Linyphiidae)  Ian Cooper

 

*Cross Orb-weaver Araneus diadematus  (Ara.: Araneidae) Ian Cooper

 

* European Sowbug  Oniscus asellus (Isopoda: Oniscidae)  Ian Cooper

2024 March 18

2024 March 18

   Yesterday, Kirsten Mills photographed two of the California Tortoiseshells that were (and still are) on the Mount Tolmie reservoir.

 

California Tortoiseshell Nymphalis californica (Lep.: Nymphalidae)   Kirsten Mills

California Tortoiseshell Nymphalis californica (Lep.: Nymphalidae)   Kirsten Mills

 

Kirsten writes:  I saw two new butterfly species today, March 18, for the year for me. First was a Satyr Comma near Hyacinth Park. The second was a Cabbage White on the corner of Cook Street and Finlayson Road.

 

Gordon Hart writes, from Highlands:  We have had two Green Commas and one Satyr Comma since Saturday March 16. I have attached pictures which nicely show some differences between the species.

Satyr Comma Polygonia satyrus  (Lep.: Nymphalidae)  Gordon Hart

Green Comma Polygonia faunus  (Lep.: Nymphalidae)  Gordon Hart

Green Comma Polygonia faunus  (Lep.: Nymphalidae)  Gordon Hart